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Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Asian Emerging Markets

  • Singapore’s success in transforming itself from a poor, vulnerable economy to one of the richest countries in the world (IMF, 2016) is nothing short of inspirational to many small economies around the globe. Given its lack of resources, Singapore relied upon foreign investors to fuel its growth not only through cash injection into the economy in the form of Foreign Direct Investments (FDI) butSingapore’s success in transforming itself from a poor, vulnerable economy to one of the richest countries in the world (IMF, 2016) is nothing short of inspirational to many small economies around the globe. Given its lack of resources, Singapore relied upon foreign investors to fuel its growth not only through cash injection into the economy in the form of Foreign Direct Investments (FDI) but also to help upgrade its skills and technological stock. This study looks at how Singapore inspired many Multi-National Corporations (MNCs) into pouring a large sum of investments into this small ailing citystate and if this idea can be generalized to apply it in other economies, especially in Oman. In a bid to explain the large flow of Capital into an economy, this study moves on further to review most prominent literature in the field since Macdougall (1958) first laid the groundwork for the subsequent theories on FDI. Based on the review of several previous studies, the most significant determinants of FDI were found to be government policy and political stability, inflation rate as a proxy for economic stability, quality of infrastructure and institutions, market size of the host country, openness to trade, tax policies and access to low cost factors of production. Through a case study method with the inductive approach, this study finds that Singapore excels in all of the determinants of FDI except for the market size of the host country and access to low-cost factors of production. However, it more than compensates for these shortcomings with its strategic geographical location and numerous bilateral and regional trade agreements that give it access to markets around the region. Oman like Singapore ranks well in many of these determinants that make it a potential destination for investment. However, the sultanate could gain more interest from the MNC’s to help its growth by optimizing its policies to lower existing barriers, easing immigration laws to meet the short term skill shortage, allowing for 100 percent foreign ownership, allowing for more liberal property rights, working to improve corruption perception and opting for more trade agreements to give it easy access to larger markets. Moreover, the economy’s heavy reliance on hydrocarbon exports is seen as a major risk by investors as it creates an economic vulnerability which could potentially overshadow many other benefits of investing in the sultanate. Besides the aforementioned determinants, a lot also depends on the success of Oman’s diversification plans.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Document Type:Master's Thesis
Zitierlink: https://opus.hs-offenburg.de/7734
Bibliografische Angaben
Title (English):Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Asian Emerging Markets
Subtitle (English):A case study of Singapore’s success with FDI and potential new opportunities in Oman
Author:Ashin Shrestha
Advisor:Andreas Klasen, Rainer Fischer
Year of Publication:2017
Granting Institution:Hochschule Offenburg
Page Number:100
Language:English
Inhaltliche Informationen
Institutes:Fakultät Wirtschaft (W)
Institutes:Abschlussarbeiten / Master-Studiengänge / IBC
Tag:Foreign Direct Investment; determinats of FDI
Formale Angaben
Open Access: Closed 
Licence (German):License LogoUrheberrechtlich geschützt
SWB-ID:1858038545