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Development and implementation of a cyclic plasticity model with thermal softening for hot work tool steel

  • Hot working tools are subjected to complex thermal and mechanical loads during service. Locally, the stresses can exceed the material’s yield strength in highly loaded areas. During production, this causes cyclic plastic deformation and thus thermomechanical fatigue, which can significantly shorten the lifetime of hot working tools. To sustain this high loads, the hot working tools are typicallyHot working tools are subjected to complex thermal and mechanical loads during service. Locally, the stresses can exceed the material’s yield strength in highly loaded areas. During production, this causes cyclic plastic deformation and thus thermomechanical fatigue, which can significantly shorten the lifetime of hot working tools. To sustain this high loads, the hot working tools are typically made of tempered martensitic hot work tool steels. While the annealing temperatures of the tool steels usually lie in the range of 400 to 600 °C, the steels may experience even higher temperatures during hot working, resulting in softening of the material due to changes in microstructure. Therefore, the temperature-dependent cyclic mechanical properties of the frequently used hot work tool steel 1.2367 (X38CrMoV5-3) after tempering are investigated in this work. To this end, hardness measurements are performed. Furthermore, the Institute of Forming Technology and Machines (IFUM) provides test results from cyclic tests at temperatures ranging from 20 °C (room temperature) to 650 °C. To describe the observed time- and temperature-dependent softening during tempering, a kinetic model for the evolution of the mean size of secondary carbides based on Ostwald ripening is developed. In addition, both mechanism-based and phenomenological relationships for the cyclic mechanical properties of the Ramberg- Osgood model depending on carbide size and temperature are proposed. The stress-strain hysteresis loops measured at different temperatures and after different heat treatments can be well described with the proposed kinetic and mechanical model. Furthermore, the model is suitable for integration in advanced mechanism-based lifetime models. However, since the Ramberg-Osgood model is not suitable for finite element implementation, a temperature-dependent incremental cyclic plasticity model is presented as well. Thus, softening due to particle coarsening can be applied in the finite element method (FEM). Therefore, a kinetic model is coupled with a cyclic plasticity model including kinematic hardening. The plasticity model is implemented via subroutines in the finite element program ABAQUS for implicit integration (subroutine called UMAT) and explicit integration (subroutine called VUMAT). The implemented model is used for the simulation of an exemplary hot working process to assess the effects of softening due to particle coarsening. It shows that the thermal softening at high temperatures, which occur over a long time at a mechanically highly loaded area, has a great influence. If this influence is not considered in tool design, an unexpected tool failure might occur bringing the production to a standstill.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Andreas Jilg
Year of Publication:2019
Pagenumber:104
Language:English
GND Keyword:Finite-Elemente-Methode; Plastizität; Warmarbeitsstahl
Tag:thermische Entfestigung
DDC classes:600 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften
Referee:Holm Altenbach, Manja Krüger, Thomas SeifertORCiDGND
Advisor:Thomas Seifert
Publishing Institution:Hochschule Offenburg
Granting Institution:Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg
Date of final exam:2019/06/28
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Open Access:Frei zugänglich
Institutes:Bibliografie
Release Date:2019/12/11
Licence (German):License LogoEs gilt das UrhG
DOI:https://doi.org/10.25673/25393