The search result changed since you submitted your search request. Documents might be displayed in a different sort order.
  • search hit 49 of 59
Back to Result List

Biological in situ methanation: Gassing concept and feeding strategy for enhanced performance

  • The expansion of fluctuating renewable electricity production from wind and solar energy requires huge storage capacities. Power-to-gas (PtG) can contribute to tackle that issue via a two-step process, the electrolytic production of hydrogen and a subsequent methanation step (with additional CO2). The resulting fully grid compatible methane, also known as synthetic natural gas (SNG), can be bothThe expansion of fluctuating renewable electricity production from wind and solar energy requires huge storage capacities. Power-to-gas (PtG) can contribute to tackle that issue via a two-step process, the electrolytic production of hydrogen and a subsequent methanation step (with additional CO2). The resulting fully grid compatible methane, also known as synthetic natural gas (SNG), can be both stored and transported in the vast existing natural gas infrastructure. To overcome current major drawbacks of PtG, the relatively low efficiency and the high costs, we developed an improved method for the methanation step. In our approach we use a further development of the biological in situ methanation of hydrogen in biogas plants. Because this strategy uses directly internal residual CO2 from the biogas process in the biogas plant, you neither need additional external CO2 nor special reactors. Thus, PtG is combined with the production of an upgraded highly methane rich raw biogas. However, the low solubility of hydrogen in aqueous solutions and the exploitation of the maximum biological production rates are still an engineering challenge for high performance biological in situ methanation. In our experiments a setup with membrane gassing turned out to be most promising to ensure a sufficient gas liquid mass transfer of the hydrogen. The monitoring of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic archaea showed some adaption of these microbial subgroups to the hydrogen feed. In order to achieve high methane concentrations of more than 90 % in the raw biogas a CO2-controlled hydrogen feed flow rate is suggested. For methane concentrations lower than 90 % simple current controlled hydrogen supply can be applied.show moreshow less

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar
Metadaten
Author:Christiane ZellGND, Ulrich HochbergGND, Katharina Haas
Year of Publication:2017
Pagenumber:1
Language:English
Parent Title (English):International Biotechnology Congress-2017 April 25-27, 2017 Xi’an, China
First Page:1
Last Page:1
Document Type:Conference Proceeding
Institutes:Hochschule Offenburg / Bibliografie
Release Date:2018/01/04
Licence (German):License LogoEs gilt das UrhG